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USMS Certified Swim Coach Levels 1 & 2

Last Updated:  8/18/15

USMS Certified Swim Coach Levels 1 & 2:

NPI # 1689055840

What is the US Masters Swimming?  Please watch the short intro video which explains it: https://www.youtube.com/embed/SbZJNvhjC-g

I enjoy swimming for a variety of reasons. It's particularly condusive for those obese or overweight as a safe way to lose weight while building lean muscle mass with minimal risk of injury in a total body workout.  According to MayoClinic.com, it's also helpful for the natural management of fibromyalgia and certain rheumatology conditions.  

I learned to swim at the age of 2 at the UCSF Parnassus Campus pool.  Growing up, I always had access to a pool, lake, or ocean and taught my sister how to swim and enjoyed doing that.

I've been swimming regularly for over ten years and joined a US Masters swim team.  I became motivated to take the coaching certification with the plan to coach people diagnosed with illnesses like fibromyalgia and various rheumatology conditions to help motivated them to keep up with their hydrotherapy.  

I am trained in all the basic swim strokes, starts, turns and transitions as well as swim stroke correction and development.  

Triathletes can benefit from swim coaching to improve their time during this crucial part of their races.  According to my training, triathletes struggle most of all with the swimming component.  Correct swimming technique often shows results in saving precious seconds/minutes in the cycling and/or running aspects.  So it's worth it to invest some time in proper swim technique.  I'd recommend a swim coach who's dedicated to work with triathletes.  While I have the training...I don't particularly have the experience with this population.  My passion lies with the rehab population and those who desire to lose weight.

A relevant video for triathletes to watch:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=en1cGWN0L3w

For more information on my training program, click on this link: http://www.usms.org/content/coachcertoutlines

My US Masters Swimming Profile: http://forums.usms.org/member.php?43100-SFNativeFreya

I'm registered to become a certified Lifeguard in September of this year.

I use the website: www.swimplan.com to generate swim workouts, measure my swimming ability by various strokes, time my trials in various strokes and log stroke counts.  It's a free website and worth signing up for to generate the workouts.

I log my swim workouts and all exercise activity on the www.usms.org website.  

SWIMMING WEBSITES:

www.usms.org = An all in one stop shop site.

www.swimplan.com = Individual workout plans and stats

www.swimmersguide.com = Worldwide Pool Locator

www.swimtrek.com = Worldwide Open Water Swimming

www.loneswimmer.com = Open Water Swimming

www.marathonswimmers.org = Worldwide Open Water Swimming

 

SWIMMING RESEARCH & ARTICLES ON SWIMMING:

Chronic Pain Sufferer Katie Pumphrey completes 15-mile open water swim  http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2014/06/04/chronic-pain-sufferer-katie-pumphrey-completes-15-mile-open-water-swim/

Swimming and Cardiovascular Fitness in the Older Age Group  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1195697

I came across an article written by Linda Brown-Kuhn in the July-August 2014 issue of Swimmer magazine called "Marathon Moderation: The Possible Cardiac Implications of Ultra-Endurance Sports" and it raised some important health concerns about the perils of overtraining and repetitive marathons in terms of cardiac health.  So often, marathons and chronic running are praised as having enormous health benefits, which is true...but this article shows the perils and risks of chronic running and repetive marathons which I think deserves equal attention too. 

The quote that made me gasp with surprise and read further about this was:

"This type of to-the-max exercise may also be linked to coronary artery calcifcation.  In a recent study out of the Minneapolis Heart Institute and Foundation at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, published in the March/April 2014 issue of Missouri Medicine, the journal of the Missouri State Medical Association, Robert Schwartz and his colleagues compared 50 male marathon runners and 23 sedentary men.  The runners had competed in at least one marathon annually for 25 consecutive years, and they had significantly more calcified plaque volume than the nonexercisers." -- Brown-Kuhn, L (2014, July-August). Marathon Moderation: The Possible Cardiac Implications of Ultra-Endurance Sports. Swimmer. 10, 33-35.  http://www.usmsswimmer.com/ 

 

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